BONUS POST: Five Music Books to Watch Out For

From soundtracks to John Peel, from Northern Soul to musical rivalries, here’s five forthcoming music books to watch out for (all links below will bring you to our library catalogue to reserve a copy online):

beyondthebeyond
Beyond the Beyond: Music from the Films of David Lynch Hardcover – 26 Apr 2016
From his early short films made in Philadelphia in the 1960s up through more recent feature films like Inland Empire (2006), legendary artist and director David Lynch (born 1946) has used sound to build mood, subvert audience expectations and create new layers of affective meaning. Produced in conjunction with Lynch, Beyond the Beyond: Music from the Films of David Lynch explores the use of music and sound in Lynch’s films, as well as his own original music, and draws on the director’s personal archives of photographs and ephemera from Eraserhead onward. This volume also features interviews with more than a dozen popular contemporary musicians who performed at the Ace Hotel’s April 2015 benefit for the David Lynch Foundation, including The Flaming Lips, Duran Duran, Moby, Sky Ferreira, Lykke Li, Karen O, Donovan, Angelo Badalamenti, Jim James, Chrysta Bell, Tennis, Twin Peaks and Zola Jesus.

your favourite band
Your Favorite Band Is Killing Me: What Pop Music Rivalries Reveal about the Meaning of Life Paperback – 17 May 2016
Music critic Steven Hyden explores nineteen music rivalries and what they say about life
Beatles vs. Stones. Biggie vs. Tupac. Kanye vs. Taylor. Who do you choose? And what does that say about you? Actually–what do these endlessly argued-about pop music rivalries say about “us”?
Music opinions bring out passionate debate in people, and Steven Hyden knows that firsthand. Each chapter in YOUR FAVORITE BAND IS KILLING ME focuses on a pop music rivalry, from the classic to the very recent, and draws connections to the larger forces surrounding the pairing.
Through Hendrix vs. Clapton, Hyden explores burning out and fading away, while his take on Miley vs. Sinead gives readers a glimpse into the perennial battle between old and young. Funny and accessible, Hyden’s writing combines cultural criticism, personal anecdotes, and music history–and just may prompt you to give your least favorite band another chance.

mymusic
My Music, My War – The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan Paperback – 19 May 2016
In the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, recent technological developments in music listening enabled troops to carry with them vast amounts of music and easily acquire new music, for themselves and to share with their fellow troops as well as friends and loved ones far away. This ethnographic study examines U.S. troops’ musical-listening habits during and after war, and the accompanying fear, domination, violence, isolation, pain, and loss that troops experienced. My Music, My War is a moving ethnographic account of what war was like for those most intimately involved. It shows how individuals survive in the messy webs of conflicting thoughts and emotions that are intricately part of the moment-to-moment and day-to-day phenomenon of war, and the pervasive memories in its aftermath. It gives fresh insight into musical listening as it relates to social dynamics, gender, community formation, memory, trauma, and politics.

good night
Good Night and Good Riddance: How Thirty-Five Years of John Peel Helped to Shape Modern Life Paperback – 19 May 2016
Goodnight and Good Riddance: How Thirty-Five Years of John Peel Helped to Shape Modern Britain is a social history, a diary of a nation’s changing culture, and an in-depth appraisal of one of our greatest broadcasters, a man who can legitimately be called the most influential figure in post-war British popular music.

Without the support of John Peel, it’s unlikely that innumerable artists – from David Bowie to Dizzee Rascal, Jethro Tull to Joy Division – would have received national radio exposure. But Peel’s influence goes much deeper than this. Whether he was championing punk, reggae, jungle or grime, he had a unique relationship with his audience that was part taste-maker, part trusted friend.

The book focuses on some 300 shows between 1967 and 2004, giving a thorough overview of Peel’s broadcasting career and placing it in its cultural and social contexts. Peel comes alive for the reader, as do the key developments that kept him at the cutting edge – the changes in his tastes; the changes in his thinking. Just like a Peel show, Goodnight and Good Riddance is warm, informative and insightful, and wears its enthusiasm proudly.

young soul rebels
Young Soul Rebels: A Personal History of Northern Soul Paperback – 19 May 2016
‘Nothing will ever compare to the amphetamine rush of my young life and the night I was nearly buggered by my girlfriend s uncle in the Potteries …’ The opening line of Stuart Cosgrove’s Young Soul Rebels sets up a compelling and intimate story of northern soul, Britain’s most fascinating musical underground scene, and takes the reader on a journey into the iconic clubs that made it famous The Twisted Wheel, The Torch, Wigan Casino, Blackpool Mecca and Cleethorpes Pier the bootleggers that made it infamous, the splits that threatened to divide the scene, the great unknown records that built its global reputation and the crate-digging collectors that travelled to America to unearth unknown sounds. The book sweeps across fifty years of British life and places the northern soul scene in a social context: the rise of amphetamine culture, the policing of youth culture, the north-south divide, the decline of coastal Britain, the Yorkshire Ripper inquiry, the rise of Thatcherism, the miners strike, the rave scene and music in the era of the world wide web. Books have been written about northern soul before but never with the same erudition and passion. Young Soul Rebels nails a scene that is as popular today as it was in its heyday in the 1970s.

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