5 New Music Books

eno
Brian Eno: Oblique Music by Sean Albiez and David Pattie (eds.) (11 Aug 2016)
On the back of his published diary Brian Eno describes himself variously as: a mammal, a father, an artist, a celebrity, a pragmatist, a computer-user, an interviewee, and a ‘drifting clarifier’. To this list we might add rock star (on the first two Roxy Music albums); the creator of lastingly influential music (Another Green World; Music for Airports); a trusted producer (for Talking Heads, U2, Coldplay and a host of other artists); the maker of large-scale video and installation artworks; a maker of apps and interactive software; and so on. He is one of the most feted and influential musical figures of the past forty years, even though he has described himself on more than one occasion as a non-musician. This volume examines Eno’s work as a musician, as a theoretician, as a collaborator, and as a producer. Brian Eno is one of the most influential figures in popular music; an updated examination of his work on this scale is long overdue.

doboy
I am Dogboy: The Underworld Diaries by Karl Hyde (1 Sep 2016)

In 1999, Underworld’s Karl Hyde began writing a public diary. Every day since then, Hyde has documented his thoughts, lyrical works-in-progress, poetry and biographical essays alongside ‘found’ visuals. For the last sixteen years, these entries have collectively created an on-going, utterly unique monologue on Underworld’s website.

I Am Dogboy handpicks a selection of diary entries and rearranges them to create an autobiographical narrative that takes Hyde from childhood through to the exploratory early years of Underworld, an electronic act who have been peerless for the last twenty five years. Spliced throughout the narrative are standalone/abstract poetic pieces that offer occasional snapshots of life on the road and in the studio and give an insight into Hyde’s singular style of lyric writing.

The book is beautifully designed by John Warwicker – Hyde’s long time collaborator and co-founder of the Tomato collective. Karl Hyde and John Warwicker have previously published the typographic books Mmm… Skyscraper I Love You and In The Belly of St Paul.

bowie
David Bowie: The Golden Years by Roger Griffin (30 Sep 2016)

This is a day-by-day account of Bowie’s life from the start of 1970 to the end of 1980, his golden era that defined his work as a major artist a dozen inspired studio albums, five major tours, two feature films and critically acclaimed theatrical performances in Chicago and New York. He reinvented stage presentation in rock and revived the careers of Mott The Hoople, Lou Reed and Iggy Pop. David Bowie The Golden Years chronicles in fascinating detail how it all unfolded, tracking Bowie s creative life from post- Space Oddity London in 1970, through the genesis of Ziggy Stardust, The Thin White Duke, his withdrawal to West Berlin and New York in 1980. Informed by recollections from Bowie himself and his many collaborators, friends and associates of the time, the book illustrates how Bowie s influences and experiences shaped his extraordinary body of work, which in turn has inspired generations of musicians. David Bowie The Golden Years features rare some unpublished and iconic photographs from a unique era in the private and professional life of one of rock s greatest and most enduring heroes.

new york rock
New York Rock: From the Rise of the Velvet Underground to the Fall of CBGB by Steven Blush (4 Oct 2016)
As a city that represents endless possibilities, New York has been the setting for the dawning of new movements, styles, and genres. In the 20th century, the birth of Rock represented a connection between art forms and the city’s socioeconomic, racial, and sexual variants. New York Rock breaks down the rock scene’s half-century connection to New York and analyses its distinct subculture through the prism of influences, crosscurrents, and psychoactive distractions. Over 1,500 musicians, clubs, and labels held roles in the making of New York Rock, and it’s their contributions that created this iconic art form. A compilation of first hand narratives about each genre of rock, from Punk New Wave and Glitter Rock to New York Hardcore and Indie rock, New York Rock is the ultimate illustrated account of Rock’s role in New York City.

set the boy free
Set the Boy Free by Johnny Marr (3 Nov 2016)

Johnny Marr was born in 1960’s Manchester to Irish emigrant parents and knew from an early age that he would be a musician. Forming his first band, at thirteen, Marr spent his teenage years on the council estates of Wythenshawe playing guitar, devouring pop culture and inventing his own musical style.

It wasn’t until the early eighties, when Marr turned up on the doorstep of a singer named Steven Patrick Morrissey, that both a unique song writing partnership and the group recognised as one of the most iconic bands of all time were formed. In 1983 The Smiths released their first single, and within a year their eponymous debut album reached number two in the UK chart, paving the way for mainstream and critical success on their own terms.

For Marr, tensions within the band and desire for a wider musical scope lead to his departure from The Smiths in 1987, ensuring the end for one of the most influential British groups of a generation.

But this was just the beginning for Marr. From forming Electronic and The Healers to playing with Bryan Ferry, Talking Heads, Kirsty MacColl, Pet Shop Boys, Billy Bragg, Nile Rogers and Bert Jansch. From joining The Pretenders, The The, Modest Mouse and The Cribs to recently collaborating with Hans Zimmer and receiving acclaim and worldwide success in his own right as a solo artist, Marr has never stopped. Here, for the first time, he tells his own side of the story.

From roaming the streets of Manchester to constantly pushing musical boundaries as the most loved guitarist Britain has ever produced, Johnny Marr’s memoir is the true history of music – told by one of its very own legends.

 

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