RELEASE DAY REVIEW: Wanted, A Gentleman by K. J. Charles

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This was my first book by K J Charles, whose historical romances I had seen about, but never tried. I thought I’d give this a shot, having really liked the premise (a writer of romances, who also runs a gazette called The Matrimonial Advertiser) and props to Riptide for the way they blurbed the book like an advert featured in the gazette:

wanted-a-gentleman

It’s a bit of a romp, this. Martin St. Vincent, a black business owner at a time when they were very much a rarity is trying to get his former slaver’s only daughter away from the man who has been secretly wooing her through the personals. Cue Theodore Swann, operator of The Matrimonial Advertiser and their meeting.

It was quite a solid, short book that was well written. Charles has a great command of using language to evoke a time, and slipped in then regularly used words into the prose almost unnoticed (although, it took me a little while to realise what she meant when she referred to ‘the stand’, which I found quite funny when I realised!).

Liked Theo and his writing of romances as Dorothea Swann. Wasn’t as much a fan of Martin, who is described well, but I feel overall the book is a little skewed in his view, despite Theo arguably being ‘the main character’; almost the whole way through Theo is referred to, disparagingly, as ineffectual, slight, and forgettable, which left me wondering by the time they got together, why they did considering those comments. This was reined in a little when they did get together, but it felt like the damage was done and I had real trouble connecting with and believing their connection. If this aspect wasn’t there, the book would’ve been much improved, I feel. Still, there are plus points, such as Theo’s ‘dirty mouth’ wonderfully puncturing the Victorian air and posturing, which grounded the book quite well. Their characters and their motivations are understandable, as is the ‘twist’ about two-thirds in.

Overall, a book that I’m sure will appeal to Charles’ many fans, and I shall be definitely reading more of her books, and while this was a little disappointing it still has lots to recommend it, especially Charles’ evocative way with words. If any of you have read more KJ Charles, what book of hers should I read next?

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