5 New Computer Books to Watch Out For

turings-vision
Turing’s Vision: The Birth of Computer Science by Chris Bernhardt (12 May 2017)
If you want to push your Java skills to the next level, this practical book provides expert advice from leading luminaries within the Java ecosystem. You ll be encouraged to stretch yourself by learning new techniques, look at problems in new ways, take responsibility for your work, and become as good at the entire craft of programming as you possibly can.Edited by Kevlin Henney, “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know” reflects many lifetimes of experience writing Java software and living with the process of software development. Some of the best Java programmers on the planet share their collected wisdom to help you rethink Java best practices and techniques to incorporate the changes in Java 8

minecraft-lego-projects
Minecraft LEGO Projects: Modeling Mobs and Monsters with Real World Redstone by Jon Lazar (17 May 2017)

This book starts with simple blocks and shows you how to build large, custom versions of all of your favorite Minecraft characters, mobs, monsters, and tools. Then it takes you a step further and shows you how to add electronic components (real-life Redstone!) to add lights and sound to your creations.

Jon Lazar, author of Arduino LEGO Projects and creator of the famous LEGO TARDIS, shows you how to go beyond the boxed sets to create larger custom models of all of your Minecraft favorites with LEGO.
What you’ll learn:
  • Learn how to create large custom Minecraft characters, animals, mobs, tools and weapons with standard LEGO blocks―no need for a boxed set
  • Learn how to add electronics to your Minecraft LEGO creations―just like real-life Redstone
  • Learn basic programming with the Arduino IDE and language
  • Learn basic electronics concepts as you bring life to your LEGO Minecraft creations
Who this book is for:

Minecraft and LEGO enthusiasts, students and teachers, and anyone who likes learning while having fun!

unsolved-craig-bauer
Unsolved!: The History and Mystery of the World’s Greatest Ciphers from Ancient Egypt to Online Secret Societies by Craig Bauer (6 Jun 2017)
In 1953, a man was found dead from cyanide poisoning near the Philadelphia airport with a picture of a Nazi aircraft in his wallet. Taped to his abdomen was an enciphered message. In 1912, a book dealer named Wilfrid Voynich came into possession of an illuminated cipher manuscript once belonging to Emperor Rudolf II, who was obsessed with alchemy and the occult. Wartime codebreakers tried–and failed–to unlock the book’s secrets, and it remains an enigma to this day. In this lively and entertaining book, Craig Bauer examines these and other vexing ciphers yet to be cracked. Some may reveal the identity of a spy or serial killer, provide the location of buried treasure, or expose a secret society–while others may be elaborate hoaxes. Unsolved! begins by explaining the basics of cryptology, and then explores the history behind an array of unsolved ciphers. It looks at ancient ciphers, ciphers created by artists and composers, ciphers left by killers and victims, Cold War ciphers, and many others. Some are infamous, like the ciphers in the Zodiac letters, while others were created purely as intellectual challenges by figures such as Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P. Feynman. Bauer lays out the evidence surrounding each cipher, describes the efforts of geniuses and eccentrics–in some cases both–to decipher it, and invites readers to try their hand at puzzles that have stymied so many others. Unsolved! takes readers from the ancient world to the digital age, providing an amazing tour of many of history’s greatest unsolved ciphers.

creative-projects-with-raspberry-pi
Creative Projects with Raspberry Pi: Build gadgets, cameras, tools, games and more with this guide to Raspberry Pi by Kirsten Kearney and Will Freeman (15 Jun 2017)

Raspberry Pi is the most versatile and affordable computer ever made – and you don’t even need any coding skills to use it. Showing the many different ways to use Raspberry Pi, the projects in this book will appeal to creatives from all walks of life.

The Raspberry Pi was designed expressly to make computer programming fun and enjoyable. The size of a credit card, the little circuit board computer is cheap and simple enough for anyone, anywhere in the world, to learn how to create computer programs easily. Learn step by step how to complete simple projects with your Raspberry Pi and explore the most innovative inventions ever made with the little computer that could. These amazing ‘Pideas’ show how easy it is to develop fantastic homebrew electronics. With tips from master Pi engineers you can create anything you can think of, from your own video games and robots to expressing yourself artistically, and even performing scientific experiments.

25 of these projects are sourced from the greatest makers in the world, and are designed to showcase the ultimate possibilities with Pi. These are accompanied by 10 ‘inspired-by’ projects that even a novice could make, including full step-by-step building instructions. Every project includes a web link to pick up extra apps and coding to make the projects even easier.

97-things-every-java-programmer-shouldknow
97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts by Kevlin Henney (30 Jun 2017)

If you want to push your Java skills to the next level, this practical book provides expert advice from leading luminaries within the Java ecosystem. You ll be encouraged to stretch yourself by learning new techniques, look at problems in new ways, take responsibility for your work, and become as good at the entire craft of programming as you possibly can.Edited by Kevlin Henney, “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know” reflects many lifetimes of experience writing Java software and living with the process of software development. Some of the best Java programmers on the planet share their collected wisdom to help you rethink Java best practices and techniques to incorporate the changes in Java 8

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