5 Architecture Book to Watch Out For

Builders, Housewives and the Construction of Modern Athens by Ioanna Theocharopoulou (27 Jul 2017)
builders.jpg
Sprawling beneath the Acropolis, modern Athens is commonly viewed in negative terms: congested, ugly and monotonous. A Mediterranean version of “informal” urbanism prevalent throughout the so-called developing world, Builders, Housewives and the Construction of Modern Athens reassesses the explosive growth of post-war Athens through its most distinctive building type, the polykatoikia, a small-scale multi-storey apartment block (from poly meaning “multiple” and oikos meaning “house”).

Theocharopoulou re-evaluates the polykatoikia as a low-tech, easily constructible innovation that stimulated the post-war urban economy, triggering the city’s social mid-twentieth century transformation, enabling the migrants who poured into Athens to become urban citizens, aspiring to a modern life. The interiors of the polykatoikia apartments reflect a desire for modernity as marketed to housewives through film and magazines. Regular builders became unlikely allies in designing these polykatoikia interiors, enabling inhabitants to exert agency over their daily lives and the shape of the post-war city.

Theocharopoulou’s reading draws on popular media as well as urban and regional planning theory, cultural studies and anthropology to examine the evolution of this phenomenon and, in light of Greece’s recent financial crisis, considers the role polykatoikia might play in building an equitable and sustainable twenty-first-century city.

The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, Fourth Edition: A Complete Catalog by William Allin Storrer (1 Aug 2017)
frank lloyd.jpg
From sprawling houses to compact bungalows and from world-famous museums to a still-working gas station, Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs can be found in nearly every corner of the country. While the renowned architect passed away more than fifty years ago, researchers and enthusiasts are still uncovering structures that should be attributed to him. William Allin Storrer is one of the experts leading this charge, and his definitive guide, The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, has long been the resource of choice for anyone interested in Wright. Thanks to the work of Storrer and his colleagues at the Rediscovering Wright Project, thirty-seven new sites have recently been identified as the work of Wright. Together with more photos, updated and expanded entries, and a new essay on the evolution of Wright’s unparalleled architectural style, this new edition is the most comprehensive and authoritative catalog available. Organized chronologically, the catalog includes full-color photos, location information, and historical and architectural background for all of Wright’s extant structures in the United States and abroad, as well as entries for works that have been demolished over the years. A geographic listing makes it easy for traveling Wright fans to find nearby structures and a new key indicates whether a site is open to the public. Publishing for Wright’s sesquicentennial, this new edition will be a trusted companion for anyone embarking on their own journeys through the wonder and genius of Frank Lloyd Wright.

The History of England’s Cathedrals by Nicholas Orme (1 Sep 2017)
history of
England’s sixty or so Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals are among its most iconic buildings and attract thousands of worshippers and visitors every year. Yet though much has been written about their architecture, there is no complete guide to their history and activities. This book provides the first rounded account of the whole of their 1700 years from Roman times to the present day. It explains the layout of their buildings, the people who ran them, their worship and music, their links with learning and education, and their outreach to society. It relates their history to the history of England and shows how they adapted to change and weathered disasters to survive as great repositories of our national history.

London Theatres by Michael Coveney and Peter Dazeley (7 Sep 2017)
london theatres
London is the theatre capital of the world. From world-famous musicals to West End shows, from cutting-edge plays to Shakespeare in its original staging, from outdoor performance to intimate fringe theatre, the range and quality is unsurpassed.

Leading theatre critic Michael Coveney invites you on a tour of the forty-five theatres which make the London stage what it is, with stories of the architecture, the people and the productions which have defined each one. Sumptuous photographs by Peter Dazeley of the public areas, auditorium and backstage complete the picture.

Contents include:
1. Grandes Dames: The Grade I listed Haymarket, Drury Lane, and Covent Garden Opera House
2. Palaces of Pleasure: The London Palladium, the Coliseum, Lyceum, and Prince of Wales
3. Popular landmarks: The National Theatre, Old Vic, Shakespeare’s Globe, Roundhouse, and Royal Court
4. Informal delights: The Young Vic, Almeida, Donmar, and The Other Palace, opening 2017
5. Legends Alive: Richmond Theatre, The Playhouse, Adelphi, and the New Ambassadors
6. Hidden Gems: Alexandra Palace, The BBC Radio Theatre, Normansfield and Charing Cross theatres
7. Eastward Ho!: Barbican, Hackney Empire, Stratford East, and Wilton’s Music Hall
8. West End jewels: The Savoy, Novello, Duke of York’s, St Martin’s, and Criterion

Perfect English Farmhouse by Ros Byam Shaw and Jan Baldwin (10 Oct 2017)
perfect english.jpgPerfect English Farmhouse celebrates the characteristic style and fascinating history of the classic farmhouse and shows how to turn your own home into a similarly welcoming retreat.

Farmhouse is a word that conjures an array of appealing associations: fresh eggs and baby lambs, chunky wooden beams and flagged floors, cream teas and harvest suppers; a place of welcome and plenty. With their generous kitchens and meandering layout, the architectural informality of the farmhouse suits modern lifestyles. In Perfect English Farmhouse, via a series of case studies, Ros Byam Shaw explores both traditional and contemporary farmhouse style. The book is divided into chapters according to style: Organic, Traditional, Fresh, No Frills and Funky, and at the end of each chapter a spread highlights the key elements of that particular decorative look. At the back of the book, there is also a comprehensive listing of UK and US suppliers to help readers create their very own take on perfect farmhouse style.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s