5 New Lesbian Books to Watch Out For

As part of Pride Month here at Ballyroan Reads, here’s five new lesbian books that caught our eye:

The Practitioner by Ronica Black (20 Jun 2017)
the practitoner
Johnnie Hamilton has conquered a lot in life. An anxiety disorder, loss of her business, and homelessness have been difficult to overcome. But Johnnie has come through the other side to find success as an artist. Now, however, she’s lost her creative drive and she’s struggling to produce.

Elaine Taylor has an interesting job. She’s a “creative practitioner,” known to awaken her client’s creative side by using many different approaches, including a sensual or sexual approach. Most of her clients are male and she likes it that way. Women are the last thing she wants in her life, having lost the most important woman she’s ever known, her wife.

Fearing she’ll lose all she’s worked so hard for, Johnnie takes her friend’s advice and calls a lone number on a business card, steps into Elaine’s office, and shakes up both their worlds forever.

Repercussions by Jessica L. Webb (18 July 2017)
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Nearly fully recovered from a car accident that caused a major concussion, Edie Black is hopeful about returning to her life as a freelance journalist and college teacher. A series of bizarre incidents and the persistent feeling that she’s being followed make Edie question the reliability of her thoughts and instincts. Edie meets Skye Kenny, a brilliant and shy former soldier, and their immediate connection has Edie confessing her paranoid thoughts. Skye convinces Edie she is in real danger, and together the two women discover that information was embedded in Edie’s brain during her concussion recovery and whoever put it there will do whatever it takes to get it back. On the run, Edie and Skye must uncover who is behind this plot while keeping Edie and her mind intact. Trusting Skye with her life, Edie can only hope she can also be trusted with her heart.

Heart Stop by Radclyffe (18 Jul 2017)
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Jay “Flash” Reynolds has a brilliant future as a trauma surgeon until a truck on a rainy night changes her life. Assistant chief medical examiner Olivia Price is more at ease with the dead than the living–at least the dead never lie. All she needs to do is listen to their stories. What she doesn’t need is a surly new resident who would rather be somewhere else.

Two women, one with a damaged body, the other a damaged spirit, challenge each other to dare to live again.

If I Had the Wings by Helen Klonaris (7 Aug 2017)
if i had the wings

To be gay and growing up in the small GreekBahamian community, which feels its traditional culture and religious pieties are under threat, is fraught with constraints and even danger. The main characters in Helen Klonaris s poetic, inventive and sometimes transgressive collection of short stories confront this reality as part of their lives. Yet there are also ways in which young women in several of the stories search for roots in that tradition to fnd within it, alternatives to the dominant influence of the Orthodox church. These include attempts to make connections between their Caribbean lives and the fgures and narratives drawn from Greek mythology.

Klonaris focuses closely on family relationships, in particular the difculty of father/daughter relationships ranging from over-bearing authority, absence and incest. Klonaris s characters are very much part of the wider changes in Bahamian society, including the presence of unregistered immigrants from Haiti, and the interplay between fear, repression, hypocrisy and resistance in the relations between the state, the churches and the LGBT community.

Along the Journey River by Carole laFavor (15 Aug 2017)
along the journey river
Several sacred artifacts have gone missing from the Minnesota Red Earth Reservation and the suspect list is continuously growing. While it could be the racists from the bordering town, or a young man struggling with problems at home, or the county coroner and his cronies, the need for answers and apprehending the culprit is amplified when Jed Morriseau, the Tribal Chairman, is murdered. Investigating these mysterious occurrences because of tribal traditions and the honor of her family, Renee LaRoche works to track down the people responsible. But can she maintain her intense investigation as well as her new relationship with Samantha Salisbury, the visiting women’s studies professor at the white college nearby? Renee is caught between the traditions of her tribe and efforts to help her chimook lover accept their cultural differences.

 

 

 

5 New LGBT Books

murder in the closet
Murder in the Closet: Essays on Queer Clues in Crime Fiction Before Stonewall edited by Curtis Evans (30 Nov 2016)
Analysis of LGBTQ life before the Stonewall Riots of 1969 traditionally has been dominated by the powerful negative image of the closet, the metaphorical space where that which was deemed “”queer”” was necessarily sheltered from hostile, heteronormative public view. Literary studies of queer themes and characters in crime fiction have tended to focus on works published in the freer environment that has existed in the years since Stonewall, queer material, so the traditional belief runs, having been, for the most part, only negatively or obliquely presented in crime fiction of the closet-bound pre-Stonewall era. This book tempers this traditional view, offering readers a groundbreaking collection of twenty-three essays, in which the authors investigate queer aspects to crime fiction published over eight decades, from the corseted Victorian era to the unbuttoned Swinging Sixties, on the very eve of Stonewall. “”Murder will out,”” so the saying goes, and this is true as well of queer material in pre-Stonewall crime fiction, if one but follows the clues.

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Willful Machines by Tim Floreen (1 Dec 2016)
The closeted son of an ultra-conservative president must keep a budding romance secret from his father while protecting himself from a sentient computer program that s terrorizing the United States and has zeroed in on him as its next target in this socially conscious sci-fi thriller to shelve between “The Terminator “and “Romeo and Juliet” (“Kirkus Reviews,” starred review).
In the near future, scientists create what may be a new form of life: an artificial human named Charlotte. All goes well until Charlotte escapes, transfers her consciousness to the Internet, and begins terrorizing the American public.
Charlotte s attacks have everyone on high alert everyone except Lee Fisher, the closeted son of the US president. Lee has other things to worry about, like keeping his Secret Service detail from finding out about his crush on Nico, the eccentric, Shakespeare-obsessed new boy at school. And keeping Nico from finding out about his recent suicide attempt. And keeping himself from freaking out about all his secrets.
But when attacks start happening at his school, Lee realizes he s Charlotte s next target. Even worse, Nico may be part of Charlotte s plan too.
As Lee races to save himself, uncover Charlotte s plan, and figure out if he can trust Nico, he comes to a whole new understanding of what it means to be alive and what makes life worth living.

room for milk
Room for Milk: Doodles by Cole Escola (1 Dec 2016)
If “The Far Side” had a gay little brother with borderline personality disorder, it might look something like this book. Sometimes absurdly funny, sometimes just absurd, Room for Milk by Cole Escola will take you on an acid trip through children’s books that don’t exist and other weird illustrated fever dreams.

fury
In the Eyes of Mr Fury by Philip Ridley (6 Dec 2016)
On the day Concord Webster turned eighteen, the Devil died. The Devil’s real name was Judge Martin, but Concord’s mother called him the Devil. She said he boiled babies for dinner and made lampshades out of human skin. So why did she, who hated him so venomously, have a key to his house?

The key will unlock more than just Judge’s front door. It will also unlock a multitude of stories – where magic children talk to crows, men disappear in piles of leaves, and James Dean lookalikes kiss in dark alleys – and reveal a secret history that will change Concord’s life forever.

Philip Ridley’s second novel (following the sexually charged tour de force Crocodilia) was an instant cult classic when originally published in 1989. Now, for this new edition, Ridley has reimagined the story, expanding the original novel into the world’s first LGBT magical realist epic. A vast, labyrinthine, hall-of-mirrors saga, its breathtaking imagery and stunning plot twists – covering over a hundred years – reveal Ridley to be one of the most distinctive and innovative voices in contemporary fiction.

‘Philip Ridley’s stories compel attention.’ – The Times (London)

‘Ridley is the master of modern myth.’ – The Guardian

‘Ridley is a visionary.’ – Rolling Stone

pathogen
Pathogen by Jessica Webb (13 Dec 2016)
When a deadly virus surfaces in the small, wealthy town of Hidden Valley, British Columbia, Dr. Kate Morrison and Sergeant Andy Wyles work together to uncover the source of the outbreak. As the two women navigate their new relationship, Kate and Andy are also forced to navigate a highly political and increasingly panicked community. Still bearing the scars of her recent abduction, Kate is driven to discover how this virus attacks her critically ill patients while Andy investigates suspicions of bioterrorism. As the death count rises, Kate struggles with a crushing sense of helplessness, the pressure to keep the residents of Hidden Valley alive, and Andy s growing concern that maybe Kate hasn t yet dealt with her troubled past.